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Welcome to the official blog for "MPL Photography LLC". My name is Linda Sorensen and I am a Michigan based photographer located in the Metro Detroit area. I am dedicated to CAPTURING creative and visually pleasing digital images through a unique photographic style, PRESERVING and SHARING those images through a variety of media, and PROVIDING those services with tremendous passion, professionalism and affordable pricing. Read "MY BACKSTORY" and click "ABOUT" to learn about MPL Photography LLC. Click "PORTFOLIO" to visit the official website for MPL Photography LLC. Scroll the sidebar for the opportunity to "FOLLOW" me on social media, browse photo "GALLERIES" and read "PAST BLOG POSTS". And then "CONTACT" me today!

See My Photography in Person

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Hi Everyone – Yes, it has been awhile and I hope to post about the past few months soon

In the meantime, I was to let you know that I am a participating vendor in the Inaugural Garden City Holiday Craft and Small Business Expo being held this coming Saturday, November 28, 2015, following the Garden City Santaland Parade, from Noon to 4:00 p.m. 

The event is being held at the Garden City Moose Lodge on Ford Road just east of Middlebelt on the south side. Free parking is in the rear (no parking in front or on Ford) and there is no entry fee.  There will be about 25 vendors and small businesses and food will also be available for purchase.

In addition to offering photo prints, I am now offering canvas wraps, metal prints, calendars, photo books, magnets, and Christmas cards. 

Bring a friend and come see my photography in person, do a little holiday shopping and enjoy lunch.

To see some of my work, feel free to visit my website http://www.mplphotography.com and my Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/MPLphotographyLLC

Sweet May

“Sweet May hath come to love us, Flowers, trees, their blossoms don; And through the blue heavens above us The very clouds move on.”  ~ Heinrich Heine

Lilacs are a sign of Spring

Lilacs are a sign of Spring

“Spring is the season of new beginnings.  Fresh buds bloom, animals awaken, and the Earth seems to come to life again.” (http://www.livescience.com/24728-spring.html).

It is hard to believe it is May 1st, “May Day”!  It is once again time for me to renew my efforts to blog more often.  I look forward to sharing my photography experiences with you on a more regular basis.

The above image was captured almost one year ago, May 24, 2014.   I attended the birthday celebration of one of my young great nephews at my brother-in-law’s home on Fonda Lake in Brighton, Michigan.   It was late evening and the color of the lilac bush caught my eye.  I shot the image with my Canon 60D, EF24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, using a focal length of 70mm.  No tripod was available so it was a handheld shot with the ISO bumped to 6400, exposed at 1/100 sec, f/16.  After a little post processing in Lightroom 5 to add the vignette, I am quite pleased with the end result.  I used the image for the “Month of May” in my 2015 calendar!

 

 

Three Years and 10,000 Views Later

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Today is the day my little blog has reached and exceeded 10,000 views! To celebrate, I am giving away a 2015 Scenic Michigan Calendar to one lucky fan. Just post a new comment on your favorite post by 12:00 Noon EST on Thursday, January 15, 2015. One lucky fan will be selected to receive a calendar. Thank you so much to everyone who has visited and will visit in the future!

The Mighty Icebreaker “Mackinaw” – Queen of the Great Lakes

“Winter is not a season, it’s an occupation.” ~ Sinclair Lewis

Members of the United States Coast Guard are our everyday heroes — protecting, enforcing, searching, rescuing, and maintaining, pretty much everything maritime related — quietly carrying out those duties with little fanfare.  The USCG provides and extremely important and valued service to The Great Lakes States, especially ice cutting during the winter months; and those who carry out their USCG duties on an icebreaker during the winter have my utmost respect.  There are all types of USCG ships, but to me the ice cutters, tasked with keeping channels and harbors open to navigation during harsh winter weather, top the list.  And I am very proud to know that Michigan is the home to the USCGC Mackinaw, both the legendary and retired WAGB-83 and the new kid on the block WLBB-30!

The original USCGC Mackinaw, WAGB-83, which was launched on March 4, 1944 and was commissioned on December 20, 1944.  The 290-foot vessel, known as the “Queen of the Great Lakes” was specifically designed for icebreaking in the Great Lakes.  The northern Michigan Lake Huron river town of Cheboygan, Michigan was its home port until it was decommissioned on June 10, 2006, after 62 years of taming the harsh, wintery Great Lakes.

As a youngster vacationing in Cheboygan, I had the privilege of touring WAGB-83.  As an adult, I was once again able to tour the vessel, which is now permanently docked in Mackinaw City, Michigan, and is known as The Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum.  Below are a few of my photos of this legendary cutter.  It looks like the vessel was refurbished from a white cutter of the past to the red cutter of the present but I don’t know when.  The photos from 1970 are some of my earliest photographs.

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1970

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1970

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1970

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1970

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1979

USCGC Mackinaw WAGB-83 docked at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 1979

The decommissioned WAGB-83, now known as the Mackinaw Maritime Museum,  docked at its permanent home in Mackinaw City in 2011.

The decommissioned WAGB-83, now known as the Mackinaw Maritime Museum, docked at its permanent home in Mackinaw City in 2011.

The decommissioned WAGB-83, now known as the Mackinaw Maritime Museum,  docked at its permanent home in Mackinaw City in 2013.

The decommissioned WAGB-83, now known as the Mackinaw Maritime Museum, docked at its permanent home in Mackinaw City in 2013.

On the same day WAGB-83 was decommissioned, the smaller, more efficient, multipurpose USCGC Mackinaw WLBB-30 was commissioned.  In addition to its heavy icebreaking duties, the 240-foot vessel performs “Aids to Navigation” duties on The Great Lakes.  Below are a couple of photos of WLBB-30 while docked in the Cheboygan River.

USCGC Mackinaw WLBB-30 at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 2011.

USCGC Mackinaw WLBB-30 at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 2011.

 

USCGC Mackinaw WLBB-30 at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 2013.

USCGC Mackinaw WLBB-30 at its homeport in Cheboygan, Michigan in 2013.

While you are not able to tour WLBB-30 when it is docked in Cheboygan, you do have that opportunity while it is docked in Grand Haven, Michigan during the annual Coast Guard Festival every summer.

#PureMichigan #USCGMackinaw #Icebreakers

The “Straits” of Yesteryear!

 

2008-From Lake Huron-Freighter

Straits of Mackinac

 The “Straits of Mackinac“, as shown in the above photo I shot in 2008,  is a narrow waterway separating Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas and connecting Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. Prior to the completion of the Mackinac Bridge spanning the 5 mile width, the only way vehicles and people could travel between the two peninsulas was by car ferry.  One such ferry was called “Vacationland” which is shown in the below 1953 photograph courtesy of my grandparents’ personal photo album.  My grandfather was probably the photographer.

1953 Vactionland Ferry  (2)

Straits of Mackinac car ferry “Vacationland” in 1953

My maternal Great Grandfather and Great Great Grandfathers were lumberman in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas in the late 1800’s, early 1900’s.  Some of those ancestors moved to the Munising area, while others moved to the Grand Haven area.  But most of the family settled in Cheboygan, 15 miles southeast of the Straits, in the northern Lower Peninsula.  Eventually, the lure of the big city became too much for my grandfather, who was apparently known as somewhat of a hellion while growing up in Cheboygan.  He moved to Detroit in the late 1920’s where he met and married my maternal grandmother and raised his children, one of whom is my mother.  However, Cheboygan was still in his blood, so every summer he traveled north with his family for a two week vacation.

During those annual summer visits in the 1940’s and 1950’s, the family would load up the car and head even further north to Munising in the Upper Peninsula to visit more family and see the sites.  Since there was no bridge to cross to get to the U.P. at that time, the family had no other choice but to board one of the car ferries.  My mom has said the lines of cars were often miles long with vacationing travelers waiting to explore the U.P. and they would have to sit and wait hours just to make the trip across the Straits.  This was no doubt the highlight of the trip for the kids……the parents, probably not so much.

Below are a few more family photographs depicting “The Straits of Yesteryear”!  Enjoy!

1946 Ferry 2-1

The car ferry dock in Mackinaw City in 1946

Patiently waiting for the car ferry (in the background) to travel to the Upper Peninsula

Patiently waiting for the car ferry (in the background) to travel to the Upper Peninsula

Car ferry navigating the Straits of Mackinac in 1946

Car ferry navigating the Straits of Mackinac in 1946

St. Ignace Car Ferry Dock in 1953

St. Ignace Car Ferry Dock in 1953

#Michigan #PureMichigan #StraitsOfMackinac #CarFerry #Vacationland

 

 

2014 – Year in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.  Stats not as good as 2013, but considering the year I had with the declining health of my parents, can’t complain!  Looking to do better in 2015!

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,100 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 35 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

I’ve been “FRAMED”!

“A good photograph is knowing where to stand.” ~ Ansel Adams

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This is my first ever, start-to-finish personal work of art, which is now proudly hanging in my home.  I call this self-portrait  “Sunset from Mackinac Island”.

At the end of June 2014, I found myself desperate to escape to my favorite place on earth, Mackinac Island!  It had been a rough couple of months with both parents in and out of the hospital, and I needed a break.  Once they were both comfortably settled at home and were stable, I decided it was time to pack a bag and hit the road.  It was a solo trip as my hubby had other commitments!  It was an exhilarating and memorable trip.

The best part was being able to take in the often majestic sunset from Mackinac Island.  I rented a bicycle, strapped my trusty Manfrotto tripod with pistol grip onto the bicycle’s basket, carried my camera gear including two Canon DSLRs (60D and XTi) and a variety of lenses in my Think Tank Streetwalker Pro backpack and rode west.  The sun was setting quickly, so I didn’t quite make it to my original destination, The British Landing.  So I settled for a roadside picnic spot and proceeded to capture the magical sunset, using both cameras and various lenses.

When I realized the scene needed something more, I decided to insert myself into the photo.  My Canon 60D was on the tripod with my newest lens, the Tamron 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II.  Focal length for the shot was 11mm and in order to get the f/11 exposure I wanted with darkness quickly approaching, I bumped the ISO to 1600 and prepared to shoot at 1/5 sec.  I manually focused on the spot where I planned to stand, set camera’s timed release for 10 seconds and ran over to the rock.  I had to do this several times before I got the shot I wanted and before it got too dark.  The fact that I am wearing a red rain jacket is a fluke, but it worked well for this image.

Once home, I did a little Lightroom editing — tweaked the exposure and cropped it a bit.   The image remained on the computer until November 2014.  As I prepared to take a much anticipated “Framing for Photographers” class through Midwest Photography Workshops, I decided to print the image and use it for the class.  I made the 13×19 print at home on my Canon Pixma Pro-100.

During the six-week class, I learned about the aesthetics of matting and framing including color theory and how to select appropriate framing materials — type, quantity and color of mat board, type of glass, and type of frame.  Then I learned about the “nuts and bolts” of framing including what equipment is required, how the calculate mat measurements both manually and with software, how to mount prints, cut mat board, cut glass, and assemble metal frames.  I felt a bit overwhelmed at times, but managed to complete each task and put it all together for the final product which is now hanging on a wall in my home.

Now I have my own mat cutter and tools.  Let the framing continue!

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